Image from The Book Depository.

Image from The Book Depository.

Wonderstruck, a review in less than 25 words.

What can I say! 

I loved this book, and so did my kids. It would make a great gift for bookish kids between 6 (would need to be read to) and 15 (especially the artistically inclined)

600 pages.

About 200 pages of text narrating one story and around 400 black and white illustrations telling another. 

It was magic, inspiring and insightful. 

I will read everything Brian Selznick writes…. and give them to others as I have opportunity.

Next month…. Nancy Wake by Peter Fitzsimmons

9781743190487

Image from Book Depository.

The … almost…. finished work.

I say almost, because she is working a little more on the top image tonight.

….close-up…

floor detail.

….bat tree…

…..fawn tree….

‘Cottonwood’ by 14 year old. Pen on vintage pianola paper roll.

I’m really enjoying watching this girl in her happy place.

This weekend 14 year old has been putting the final touches on her year 8 major art project.

Part of being at a school that focuses on the visual arts is that the school can indulge in a few quirky assessments.

For this project students from year 8 to year 10 are given about 8 months  to complete an HSC style  ‘self directed’ piece of art. The time frame and the open-endedness of the project means the students learn lots of things about time management, focus, and exploration.

Having one idea that develops over months is very confronting for a generation used to instant-ness, but she has done so well.

I remember how stressful it was doing 2 major works for the HSC (all those years ago), especially for my Mum….

….I am hoping that the 3 years of practise prior to the real deal will all be as enjoyable for both of us.

More photos to follow.

School Art Show.

September 18, 2012

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Our schools annual art show happened again this last week.

I am always astonished and delighted by what primary school children can create.

I find it extremely inspiring……I hope you do too.

Portraits made of books. Image from My Human Computer.

Yes ‘How Pinteresting?’ is still interactive. Please leave your ideas for pinning in the comment section below.

But….to continue with my extended book week posts, I have put together a group of images related to the book.

You can find them by clicking here.

And don’t worry Ali….. I have pushed your idea for pinteresting caravans and airstreams until next time…… hope you don’t mind.

This week I start art class after a very long break.

More out of convenience than anything else I have enrolled in ‘continuing projects’.

The problem is….. I am sort of starting a fresh rather than continuing so I need your help.

Over that last couple of months I have been collecting still life images (because I am fascinated by the comfortingness of them). I think I would like to recreate them as  drawings or paintings or collages …. or maybe even something all together different. I would love to experiment with stitching and fabric within works too.

I just don’t know where to start.

Please help me out by letting me know in the comments which images appeal to you and how you would like to see them recreated. I am not promising to obey your every visual wish but your feedback would help enormously. Thanks.

1. Latte and sunnies.Image from the bottom of my laundry basket.

2. Muffins on a board. Image from Modern Country.

3. Spilt coffee.Image credit decor8blog.

4. Extra strong cappacino. Image mine.

5. French press and small bites. Image from decor8blog.

6. Three pears and a pomegranate. Image from decor8blog

7. A vase, a painting and a deer. Image the lennoxx.

8. Napkin with sprig and duck egg.Image from the house of Turquoise.

9. Pink flowers in a lime vase. Image from the house of Turquoise.

10. Sweet peas and mini bird eggs. Image from the house of Turquoise.

Please give me some direction…. even if it’s just the number of the picture.

….and yes, I will do some updates as to how the classes and paintings are going.

May even have a give-away, but only if you help me know where to start.

A quick upcycle

June 26, 2012

Image from Etsy store CraftieRobot.

At the beginning of the year I bought this bag for 12 year old to take to school.

It was a little too small from the beginning and was pushed to it’s limits many times.

….. and ….well it broke.

The closures came away and it got a ‘cannot be mended’ hole in the base.

She was very sad because she really loved the illustration…… so I upcycled it into a new bag.

I used the picture as a zippered front pocket with a little pen pocket to the side.

She needs a bag for her extras…. PE clothes, dance clothes, drama costumes….that sort of thing.

I even reused the original bags inside pocket on the new one.

The black bag was already made I bought it at BlankClothing for about $4.

 

Facebook Friday

November 11, 2011

Thanks Shelley

Folded book Tutorial

September 1, 2011

A3 size paper.... (A4 works too but gives you a very small book)

Fold paper in half lengthways....

Open the fold back out.

Fold paper in half the other way....

Fold it in half again the same way...ie last 2 folds parallel to each other.

Open it all back out flat again. Your page will be divided into 8 even rectangles.

Fold the paper in half again....(the long side halved by the fold).

Cut along the crease line from folded side to where the creases meet.

Open the page out again then fold it in half lengthways again until you get this shape.

Push the ends together until the paper forms a + shape.... then fold the paper onto itself to form the book.

After you have done that... lay the book out flat again. The page sequence is shown in the picture.

Write and Illustrate your book ...closed...

....or open. 5 year old looking back at a finished book to check her mermaid drawing.

This one is so easy you could do it today ….I love craft activities like that!

P.S. Sorry about the quality of the pictures. The light in our lougeroom is a shocker.

Illustration from Hansel and Gretel by Anthony Browne. Image from The apple and the egg.

Author/Illustrator: Anthony Browne

Genre: childrens picture books

Artists medium: Pencil and very controlled watercolour.

Age Appropriateness: a bit book dependent…. baby to older primary…… through to adults.

Introduction: Although Anthony Browne is best known for his books featuring gorillas, my first real exposure was very recently while in the library with 5 year old ….researching for this series of posts. I came across and read ‘In the forest’. I love how the pictures are predominantly  black and white with the subject being in colour. I also loved the way the story required other book knowledge.

This book lead us on the path of revisiting fairy tales (which we hadn’t read a lot of recently). The experience reminded me of Tim’s english literature lecturer who said (20 years ago) …. much of the imagery in literature is lost because students don’t have a good grounding in biblical literature….I wondered how much children miss out on when not exposed to the ‘old fairy tales’. Interestingly enough….at least to me … academics are starting to acknowledge that reading the ‘old fairy tales’ and experiencing books from moments in history when thinking was different to ours, aids in encouraging the imagination. Nic blogs about it  this idea here.

Other work: Voices in the park, My Dad, My Mum, Zoo, Willy and  Hugh, Little Beauty, Gorilla, Willy the Wimp, the tunnel, Silly Billy, Piggybook, Changes, Willy the dreamer, Look what I’ve got, Hansel and Gretel, Bear Hunt, Willy the Champ, The Shape Game, Willy the Wizard, Through the magic mirror, Willy’s pictures, Bears Magic Pencil, Me and You, The night Shimmy, My Brother, Things I like, King Kong, I Like Books, The Tunnel, Willy’s pictures. (Over 40 books if you include translations)

       

…again too many books to show the covers of all of them

Review:

 Anthony Browne is an internationally acclaimed author and illustrator of children’s books, with nearly 40 titles to his name. He creates strongly narrative watercolours that blend near-photographic realism with fantastical, surreal touches and ingenious visual puns. His skilful use of colour, pattern and background detail subtly conveys an exquisite empathy for his lonely and sensitive child protagonists (both human and ape). Gorillas feature in many of Anthony’s books. He says, ‘I am fascinated by them and the contrast they represent – their huge strength and gentleness. They’re thought of as being very fierce creatures and they’re not.’

Children’s laureate website.


Interviews: You can read CBBS’ author spotlight…including questions from kids here.

Video:

Activities from books: Play the Shape game.

Art: book illustration plates available as artworks from the Illustration Cupboard.